When social partners unite - explaining continuity and change in Austrian and Dutch labour market governance


Soentken, Menno ; Weishaupt, J. Timo



DOI: https://doi.org/10.1111/spol.12100
URL: http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/spol.12...
Additional URL: http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/spol.12...
Document Type: Article
Year of publication: 2015
The title of a journal, publication series: Social Policy & Administration : SP&A
Volume: 49
Issue number: 5
Page range: 593-611
Place of publication: Oxford [u.a.]
Publishing house: Wiley-Blackwell
ISSN: 0144-5596 , 1467-9515
Publication language: English
Institution: Außerfakultäre Einrichtungen > Mannheim Centre for European Social Research - Research Department A
Subject: 300 Social sciences, sociology, anthropology
Abstract: Why do Austria and the Netherlands, two highly corporatist, coordinated, consensual countries diverge with respect to the involvement of social partners in their Public Employment Service? By comparing and contrasting the competing predictions of the power-resource, employer-centred and social partnership approaches, we identify a key omitted variable that can explain the observed variations: the ability of the social partners to unite on reform positions. We demonstrate that when the social partners are divided, their collective power is reduced and partisan-based policy outcomes become more pronounced. In turn, when the social partners jointly favour a particular outcome, their collective power increases and they can override governmental reform plans, even if the government holds a large legislative majority. These findings highlight the causal importance of power relations between and within the social partners for institutional continuity and change.

Dieser Eintrag ist Teil der Universitätsbibliographie.




+ Citation Example and Export

Soentken, Menno ; Weishaupt, J. Timo (2015) When social partners unite - explaining continuity and change in Austrian and Dutch labour market governance. Social Policy & Administration : SP&A Oxford [u.a.] 49 5 593-611 [Article]


+ Search Authors in

+ Page Views

Hits per month over past year

Detailed information



You have found an error? Please let us know about your desired correction here: E-Mail


Actions (login required)

Show item Show item