Halo effects in trait assessment depend on information valence: Why being honest makes you industrious, but lying does not make you lazy


Gräf, Michael ; Unkelbach, Christian


DOI: https://doi.org/10.1177/0146167215627137
URL: https://journals.sagepub.com/doi/full/10.1177/0146...
Additional URL: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26811437
Document Type: Article
Year of publication: 2016
The title of a journal, publication series: Personality and Social Psychology Bulletin : PSPB
Volume: 42
Issue number: 3
Page range: 290-310
Place of publication: Thousand Oaks, CA
Publishing house: Sage Publications
ISSN: 0146-1672 , 1552-7433
Publication language: English
Institution: School of Social Sciences > Allgemeine Psychologie (Bröder)
Subject: 150 Psychology
Abstract: We propose stronger halo effects in trait assessments from positive information relative to negative information. Due to positive information’s higher similarity, positive information should foster both indirect (from a global impression to traits) and direct halo effects (from traits to traits). Negative information’s relative distinctiveness should foster only direct halo effects, leading to weaker halo effects overall. Four experiments support these predictions using agency traits and communion traits and behaviors. Further supporting the predictions, halo effects from positive information were visible both within (i.e., from communion/agency information to communion/agency traits) and across (i.e., from agency/communion information to communion/agency traits) these fundamental dimensions of social perception. Halo effects from negative information were visible only within dimensions. The study thereby explains why halo effects from negative information are usually weaker; it supports different processes underlying halo effects; and it provides a case in person perception where positive information has more impact than negative information.

Dieser Eintrag ist Teil der Universitätsbibliographie.




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Gräf, Michael ; Unkelbach, Christian (2016) Halo effects in trait assessment depend on information valence: Why being honest makes you industrious, but lying does not make you lazy. Personality and Social Psychology Bulletin : PSPB Thousand Oaks, CA 42 3 290-310 [Article]


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